The Ani Joon Review: Taylor Swift hits 2014 with a 1989 Banger (Video Review)

Rainy Dawg Radio’s resident vlogger reviews TSwizzle’s newest album: 1989. Check it out above ^^^

image
Ania Kamkar

gnovs’ groove: A Magic Midterm Playlist

hi fellow dawgs. if you’re like me, these past two weeks of midterms have been a struggle… and it’s not over yet. if you need to just vibe out and get a good music high, here’s a quick playlist to decompress between the hours of studying that lie ahead.

Wet – Don’t Wanna Be Your Girl

SZA – Childs Play (Chance The Rapper)

M83 – I Need You

Hippie Sabotage – Sunny

Jai Paul – BTSTU (Demo)

James Blake – Life Round Here

Chet Faker – Blush

Active Child – I’m In Your Church At Night

have a good week 🙂

image
gnovs

LT’s Choice: Topographic Map

I was driving through the back roads of Yosemite with my mom and after I had been playing my music for a while she said, “you really like songs that take forever to actually start.”

Well, she was right. Topographic Map, which is embedded below, is a list of some of my favorite songs that take forever to get going. 

The Unicorns – Child Star

The Heligoats – Arizona

Built to Spill – Things Fall Apart 

The Hotelier – An Introduction to the Album

Cymbals Eat Guitars – Share

Modest Mouse – Talking Shit About a Pretty Sunset

Grandaddy – He’s Simple, He’s Dumb, He’s the One

The Notwist – Consequence 

Have a Nice Life – The Big Gloom 

image
Lauren-Taylor Mansfield

Rad Report: Otieno Terry blows the roof off the Vera Project

I’d like you to close your eyes for a moment and imagine that some kind of intangible, energy-like force comes up from behind you and jolts you in a way that makes your body move uncontrollably. Before you realize it, liveliness is radiating out of your body in a way that can only be interpreted as dancing.

The energy that Otieno Terry brought onto the stage last Thursday night (the 23rd) was incomparable to any other artists I’ve seen perform. Although he’s a complete wildcard in the scheme of my music taste, he most obviously has the ability to create the kind of energy-like force I was referring to above. Although his music is a little more on the hip-hop/jazz/R&B end of the spectrum than I usually explore, I found myself captivated by the ambiance that radiated from his stage presence toward the crowd. Between his smooth yet hip-hoppy vocals and his exhilarating dance skills, he was able to get the whole crowd moving to his music in a way that very few artists have the ability to.

Each song that he performed had an individual flare to it with vibes pulling from different genres. He joked around about naming one of his songs after one of his band mates, but later got more serious when he revealed that one was about “falling in love and shit.” My personal favorite was his cover of Sweet Dreams (originally by Eurythmics), which he clearly made his own (as seen and heard in the video above).

After an amazing show, I was lucky enough to meet this one-of-a-kind artist with my main girl and fellow blawger Ani Joon (check out her vlog, The Ani Joon Review). I only had the opportunity to speak with him for a few minutes, but discovered that he is actually a really awesome dude. On top of that, he’s a local artist, originally from Central District. This isn’t his first time rocking shows in the Seattle area and his next show is coming up at The Crocodile on November 28th! Check him out next month and don’t miss this awesome opportunity to become enveloped in Otieno Terry’s awe-inspiring music and energy. 

Photo of Otieno Terry and me after the show

Rad Rebs

Check out more music and news from Rainy Dawg Radio @ RainyDawg.org!

Not-Bad-Not-Bad-Pretty-Good: Belated Coverage of BADBADNOTGOOD (Show Review)


BBNG jamming out somewhere. Image ripped from google.

On Tuesday October 14th, the jazzy hip-hop trio BADBADNOTGOOD performed at Neumo’s for their first time in Seattle. Yes this date has passed. Long passed. Too many days have gone in its wake for a quick-response review. This Tuesday can no longer be looked forward to. Well, maybe I needed time to digest, catch the flu, get distracted, and figure it out. You cannot attend this show unless you have a time machine in between the washer and dryer in the basement. Neglect your laundry. Let’s use this imaginative machine to relive the experience watching three young guns approach jam-virtuosity.

Jazz is all about unspoken communication. Using instruments as vocal apparatus and notes as words and phrases. You’ve heard the concept of phrasing in music if you watched any documentaries or wielded something brass in high school. Now then, you know the insanity of a well-spoken jazz ensemble in the height of improvisation. Jack Kerouac wrote about this in the 40’s. He would dig on these all-night wild be-bop musicians covered in sweat and blood and cigarette smoke in dark and airless clubs in San Francisco or New York. Whooping and cheering at the musicians, acknowledging moments when they had it, man. The whole audience shot glances at each other and simultaneously agreed: the band’s got it.

BADBADNOTGOOD have got it. I swear. They jammed too hard, clearly testing the limits of their musicianship through crescendos in volume and tempo. Their unspoken communication was amazing and apparent during extended solo sections for the jams “Hedron,” “Triangle,” as well as a silky smooth new track called “Velvet.” Conversation was killed, we were all swept off. They clearly lost themselves and we cheered them on, losing ourselves in the process. There was a subconscious agreement in the audience that up there, flooded in the river of lights and smoke, the band had achieved some kind of clarity.

One of their last tunes seemed an experiment in dexterity. There was a section that built and rose, swelling up like all of those 64th note electronic snare clacks before the predictable bass drop, though live, this intensity is more obvious and felt than the slow turning of knob. Every player attempted to burst beyond their comfort zone of their instrument. This cacophony, growing wide with the clashing of voices, the speed of flying fingers and drumsticks, was passionate and intense. This was the lifting of a weight over their collective heads heavier than they have previously lifted.

This sounds exaggerated. But hell. I’ve seen jazz gigs and the audience often appears as though they are trapped in an elevator. My generation of 20-somethings and jazz music don’t seem to go too well together. Sure, as a musician, I love jazz. I whoop and holler. But the crowd responded to BADBADNOTGOOD’s tunes in such a spirit as a punk rock show.

I caught up with Chester, the bassist, after the show and he gave a word of advice to the modern day aspiring artist, “It is about making connections. Meeting people. Saying hello and seeing how far that hello will take you.”

Check out the band’s latest music video for “CAN’T LEAVE THE NIGHT” below:

You never know who you will meet and how they can change your life forever. I know this rings true for the trio as their cover songs of popular rap cuts (Kanye West, A Tribe Called Quest, Gucchi Mane, etc.) introduced them to the absurd artistry of the Odd Future world.

The band will be back. They already have a committed, youthful, following and this is a hopeful advancement in the arts. Also, good on you Seattle for giving them such a warm welcome.

Nate Anderson