Tag Archives: another eternity

New MV: Purity Ring – bodyache

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Purity Ring’s sophomore album Another Eternity has been out for a bit now (link to the
full album review later in the article), and I am happy to say that one of my favorite songs on the LP now has a music video (of sorts). The video is a looping
animation of a female with golden feathers instead of skin set to the syrupy track, “bodyache.”

The
sugary melody of the chorus acts as the perfect high to the low of the
sorrow-filled lyrics:

“I,
I, I lied, now I’m lying awake

I,
I, I cried ‘til my body ache”

Producer
Corin Roddick initiates the track with an irresistibly sweet marimba-like riff
that hovers dreamily over the entirety of the track, teetering right on the
edges of the song alongside the vocals of singer Megan James. You can feel the gravity Roddick adds to the track with his dark synths and rubber-filled bass, leaving James
to orbit with her candied incantations.

This
track is definitely a highlight of the album, and you can check out a full
review of the album done brilliantly by Rainy Dawg’s Garret M here.

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Alexander Bonilla

Purity Ring – Another Eternity

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In 2012, Purity Ring’s debut LP, Shrines, garnered critical acclaim for its surreal take on synthpop. The record was focused and dark, with eleven fantastically produced tracks each adding to the overall occult aesthetic. Another Eternity departs from this spooky brilliance in favor of a brighter and poppier sound, while thankfully maintaining the great production values of the first album.

Unlike on Shrines, Megan James’ voice takes the front seat on Another Eternity. While the heavily processed vocals of the first album make a return on a few tracks, such as “Dust Hymns” and “Stillness in Woe”, they’re as a whole overshadowed by James’ more memorable melodies on songs such as “Heartsigh” or “Sea Castle”. MIDI vocal samples are also featured throughout the record, but are rarely the focus and serve as more of a tool in Corin Roddick’s instrumental arsenal than the lead voice.

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With less of an atmospheric vibe and brighter vocals, Another Eternity takes a step towards the mainstream and, seemingly sensing this, Roddick has slotted in elements of popular house music throughout the album. At the same time, he tries to maintain some of the weirdness that made Shrines the hit that it was. The result is what occasionally feels almost anti-EDM: A lone siren and percussion roll in “Heartsigh” among the otherwise synthpop instrumentals or a build up to a drop that never comes in “Dust Hymn”. On first listen, these sounds are jarring and feel out of place, but they quickly meld into the overall tone and are barely noticed on subsequent listens.

Aside from the house influence, Another Eternity’s instrumentals are fairly similar to those of Shrines, albeit brighter, and that’s a good thing. They’re every bit as polished as those on Purity Ring’s debut LP and leave little to be desired.

Though Another Eternity is a departure from Shrines, it is every bit as memorable. A change in tone this drastic is sure to divide the fanbase, but Corin Roddick’s fantastic production values ensure that this record sounds great and maintains a sense of cohesion between Another Eternity and Shrines. All in all, Another Eternity does well to avoid the “Sophomore slump” that is all too apparent in indie bands today.

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Garrett M