Tag Archives: blues rock

EP Review: Marty O’Reilly & The Old Soul Orchestra – Preach ‘Em Now!

       I’m going to be honest here and say
that I first found out about Marty O’Reilly & the Old Soul Orchestra only a
short time ago. I first heard the song “Cold Canary Gaslight” and fell in love
with the wonderful and distinct sound that the band produces. Marty O’Reilly’s
smoky voice paired with the delicious blend of jazz, folk, and blues instantly made this band one
of my favorites. They just recently released a new EP, called Preach ‘Em Now! and I have opinions on
it. Here they are:

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        The EP starts off with the track,
“I Heard the Angels”, which is a cover of Reverend Gary Davis’ song. Or at
least, it might be. I’m not sure what the history of the track is, or who the
first to record it was. But anyway, the track opens up with a single guitar,
playing a bluesy riff. It initially sounds like something you’d hear in an old
coffeehouse on open mic night, and I mean that in a good way. The guitar sounds
as smoky and rough as Marty’s voice, and the entire track has an almost lo-fi
tone. The kick drum joins in, then the bass, and the EP takes off. The
introduction of the violin creates a vibrancy, while the distorted guitar keeps
you laid back and slightly depressed, creating what I can only describe as a
dystopian atmosphere. The song truly does sound like the inner turmoil of a man
about to face death. Which is interesting, given it’s actually a worship song.

           The next
song is “Preach ‘Em Now!”, the EP’s title track. It starts off with a blues
rock sound, before delving into a more jazzy vibe. The whole song alternates
between jazz, blues, and blues rock. While this may sound like it would make
for a confusing and annoying song, Marty O’Reilly and the Old Soul Orchestra
makes it work. Towards the end, the song develops into an instrumental showcase
of the violin and the guitar, delighting the ears.

           “Left for
the Wolves”, the third track on the EP, slows the album back down, bringing
back the sad and slow violin and double bass. This song is a lot more jazz
heavy than the previous, with the double bass creating a laid back atmosphere
that pairs well with a fine glass of wine and a fireplace. Then, the violin
comes in periodically, sometimes shouting and sometimes whispering to the
listener, alternating the mood of the song throughout.

           “Shudder”
continues the jazz and double bass theme. However, the upbeat guitar and
bassline take the EP in a new direction: joyful. The violin is still there to
add an unsung frantic tone to the meaning of the song, but isn’t as depressing
as the previous tracks, and wails far less. The change in direction that occurs
with this song is what keeps the EP from going stale and leaving every track
sounding the same. 

           Then, to
end the EP, “Shudder” brings up the rear. Immediately, this song sounds
different. Starting the track with only vocals and a semi-acoustic guitar,
Marty O’Reilly and the Old Soul Orchestra went with a more personal feeling to
the last song on the EP. The lyrics to this song elude me, but the track gives
off a feeling of optimism in the face of opposition. This, along with the
opening track, are my favorites from the EP. 

          I liked Preach ‘Em Now! more than their previous album, mainly due to the dedicated cohesiveness the band stuck to in this instance. No song sounds dissimilar to the previous, yet each is unique and offers its own flavor to the delicious spread that is this EP. Marty O’Reilly and the Old Soul
Orchestra isn’t too well known yet, but they deserve every new listener they
receive. Give ‘em a listen.  

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Niles Kyholm



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