Rihanna is Back

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After years of anticipation, Rihanna has finally released
her 8th album, “Anti”. The first single off the album: “Work”
featuring Drake. The song is available to stream here on Tidal, and below is the official “Anti” promo clip:

To be honest, I was a bit underwhelmed in the beginning. I
mean, this is Rihanna we are talking
about. She sells out arenas, she has been on the cover of every magazine. She’s an icon. So to hear her first single sound so minimal was almost a
shock.

But then I listened a second time.

I don’t know what it was about the second listen, but I
started to come around to “Work”. I began to really listen to the sounds
in the track

– the little ambient notes in the back playing over Rihanna’s raspy
voice. And I got really into it. Let me tell you, the island vibe is omnipresent in “Work”. From the
get-go, the “Sail Away Riddim” influence is as clear as Caribbean water, and
the track sounds like the rhythm of Barbados in a glass bottle. I absolutely love how Rihanna adopts
a kind of emotionless rasp for this single; I can only describe it as a half-baked, drawn out patwa. It’s lazy
but it’s fitting, and in my mind I can see a boozy beach party on the Virgin
Islands (picture the speakers playing the tune in sync with the gentle waves and swaying palm trees).

Rihanna doesn’t sound like she’s trying too hard, and that idea in itself is enough to sell the single; it’s like she’s making a statement: “I’m Rihanna. I don’t
have to try hard.” And she doesn’t. After just three hours of its release, “Work”  hit #1 on iTunes in over 40 countries, and by now it has reached #1 in over 80
countries. Also, I would like to point out that this “hardly trying” effort at a song has
made a track that is undeniably seductive, smooth, and addictive.

Check out the track on Tidal, and make sure to give it
that second listen.

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Alexander Bonilla



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Track review: JAHKOY – “Odd Future”

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Sometimes, listening to contemporary R&B can be an exhaustive series of tracing the influence of one artist’s sound back to the work of another artist. In a world of standouts like FKA twigs, The Weeknd, Miguel, Jeremih, Drake, and more, it can be easy to forget few artists start out with a definable sound that sets them apart from comparable artists. Predictably enough, this is the case with Toronto upstart JAHKOY, whose new track, “Odd Future,” debuted over the weekend over at Apple Music on OVOSOUND Radio. 

This 5-minute ballad is a two-parter, beginning as a solemn, depressed R&B cut and nicely transitioning into an impassioned hip-hop verse. I really enjoy the production on this track. It’s got an atmospheric vibe that takes me back to some of Clams Casino’s early music, and it nicely fits to JAHKOY’s clean vocals as well as his rapped verse.

People who are familiar with Drake won’t be surprised or necessarily enthused by “Odd Future,” a song that is more sonically exciting than lyrically creative. There’s a mention of preferring the turn-up to sobriety, a lamentably short relationship, and the dangers of letting one’s personal struggle impede their success. 

JAHKOY seems intent on turning over a new leaf with this song, but unfortunately it doesn’t sound like it. There’s nothing about this track that really sticks with me, and I find JAHKOY’s vocal performance to be technically adequate but mostly drab. People who get easily caught up in trends may find something about this song worth loving the same way people tend to flock to fellow Canadian copy-Drakes Bryson Tiller and Tory Lanez. JAHKOY is intent on cashing in on this sound. It might work with some, but until he focuses his energy on memorable tunes, a stronger presence on the track, and letting the mainstream world know why we should be embracing him, JAHKOY won’t be ascending to Drake status any time soon.

Check it out right here, on Soundcloud! 

Jakob Ross is Rainy Dawg Radio’s 2015-2016 Music Director.

Check out more music and news from Rainy Dawg Radio @ RainyDawg.org!

Kendrick Lamar and J. Cole remix each other’s hits on “Black Friday”

If you weren’t sure what to be thankful for by Thursday last
week, you definitely knew by the next day. And I’m not talking about weak deals
on TV’s or other stuff for you to take home and gift wrap. I’m talking about gift
rap

On Friday, Kendrick Lamar and J. Cole each blessed us with a
new song, both of which were called “Black Friday” and both of which were
remixes of each other’s hits from the past year: Cole went off on “Alright” and
Kendrick erupted on “A Tale of 2 Citiez.”

“I’m yelling Mr. Kanye West for president/He probably let me
get some head inside the residence/I’m in the White House going all out/Bumping
College Dropout, God-bless Americans,” Kendrick shouts on his remix.

If that isn’t the best lyric you’ve heard since “To Pimp A
Butterfly,” then congrats, you’re not putting Kendrick on a pedestal like I am.
But I’ll stop when he gives me a reason to.

While Kendrick’s “Black Friday” basically just a four-minute
verse, Cole’s version can more accurately be called a full song. The man loves
hooks – I’ve seen him come up with one on a freestyle. Rest assured though,
Cole’s affinity for singing doesn’t mean he’s lacking bars:

“Cause on the same day a nigga doing different shit/Spit
different flows, hit different chicks/Let my Brixton hoes feed me fish and
chips/Why I do a lot of shows? I’m the shit, that’s it/Got suicidal doors, I
just slit my wrists.”

The craziest thing about Cole’s “Black Friday” definitely
has to be the end though, when he teases something dropping in February before
being cut off by a censor tone. Could that something be the long-teased
collaboration album with Kendrick? The entirety of the Internet seems to think
so.

Coming off critical acclaim for both of their most recent
projects, Kendrick and Cole may just deliver the best collaborative album since
Jay and Kanye’s Watch the Throne in 2012. Because as much as we liked Drake
and Future’s
What a Time To Be Alive, both of their individual releases this
year were much better. 

But could a Kendrick/Cole collaboration possibly be better
than To Pimp A Butterfly? With Kendrick spitting on the same record, Cole is
much more likely to go harder than he did on 2014 Forest Hills Drive, which
was already an incredible effort on his behalf. But TPAB was on another level,
and I don’t think Kendrick would benefit as much as Cole from working together.
Cole could help him improve his singing?

Either way, both “Black Friday” tracks are good enough to
stand on their own and stave off our hunger for the mythical collaboration a
little longer. Let’s see how many times I can replay them between now and
February.

Check out more from Mohammed
Kloub, aka DJ
Mohtorious, on Rainy Dawg Radio every Thursday from 12-1pm! 

Check out more music and news from Rainy Dawg Radio @ RainyDawg.org!

Album Review: Raury – All We Need

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Verdict: 7/10

Raury is Atlanta’s latest Hip Hop
weirdo. Because even in a scene dominated by the likes of Gucci Mane, Wacka
Flocka, Migos, and Rich Homie Quan, there’s room for Andre 3000, Father and
Childish Gambino to thrive.

19 year old Raury brings his A-Game
for major label debut, All We Need,
but there are too few pleasant surprises. All
We Need
feels like a mere continuation of his Indigo Child EP, which,
although great, came out an entire year ago.

There are big name features this
time around, however. The RZA makes an emotional appearance on “CPU”, a song
that’s almost great. Southern royalty Big K.R.I.T. shows up to drop a pointed
verse on “Forbidden Knowledge”, an album highlight.

Raury’s eclectic brand of hip hop
blends rap with folk, spitfire verses with acoustic riffs. It’s a fascinating
take, but one that he hasn’t been fully realized yet. Some songs have fire raps,
but are marred by singing that’s just a little off. This is most blatant on
songs like “Revolution” and “CPU”.

“Devil’s Whisper” is the most
fully realized song on the album, a song where Raury does his thing and does it
well. Its soulful, upbeat tempo will have feet stomping and heads nodding.

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“I could be Juicy J,” Raury raps. But
he won’t, because his heart “burns in the fire of the truth.”

Raury wants to make music that has
a positive influence on his generation. He expanded on that in an interview
with Teen Vogue, “With this album I just want to show the kids to find
themselves in love. That’s why I called it All
We Need
because that’s really all we need…to stand up for each other and
the future and just make a better society.”

“I’m not trying to be a preacher,”
Raury says, but that doesn’t stop him from casting a critical eye on the
world’s bullshit. His lyrics, although sometimes overly dystopian, ring with
poignancy: “The insipid motherfucker called ‘humanity’/Raping and damaging
everything in its way” and “We slaughter for profit, our sons know no father/The
ozone the word that is no longer brought up” are just two scathing zingers off
of magnificent title song ‘All We Need,’ where Raury likens our earth to a
burning room.

“Crystal Express” is the album’s
peak, an energetic, ceaselessly cheerful song that celebrates finding peace.  “Life is in the moment/And life is incoherent,”
Raury sings. Indeed.

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Other highlights are “Woodcrest
Manor II”, “Friends”, and “Peace Prevail”. “Friends” especially, because it’s
one of the songs on this album where Raury succeeds in his psychedelic
strivings. Title song “All We Need” succeeds most in the psychedelic regard,
opening with an escalating drone that fades into an extra-terrestrial guitar
riff. The beat switch during K.R.I.T.’s verse on “Forbidden Knowledge” is
another great moment.

All
We Need
is a strong debut album from Raury. He’s got a good deal of
potential and his future looks bright. Check this album out, get familiar with
the man who might be a household name someday soon. He does have a major label
deal after all.

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Pranav Shivanna



Check out more music and news from Rainy Dawg Radio @ RainyDawg.org!

New Track: “Money Trees Deuce“ – Jay Rock

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Jay Rock’s new single “Money Trees Deuceis a tantalizing release for his upcoming album. The last we
heard from him was the single “Pay for It,
featuring Kendrick Lamar and Chantal. This was all the way back in late October of last
year.

A reference to his feature on “Money Trees” off Lamar’s good kid, mA.A.d. city, this time around
the song is all Jay Rock. At almost five and a half minutes, it offers ample
support as to why the long wait for his next album will have been worth it.

Opening with smooth, dark horns, the beat implies a dim
story is about to develop. The relaxed vibe is decreased slightly with the
addition of a clapping snare as Rock begins his first verse, and the final
layer of subtle bass and drum kick sets the tone for a laid-back but charged
tale.

Rock’s lyrics and steady flow convey a tough story that he
is all too familiar with. Over his three verses, a drug-laced, fatal stumble
towards the all-encompassing goal of getting money unfolds. He raps, “I’m a
locomotive, steam rolling, gotta fight to keep that money stream open”, which
paired with his usual raw inflection, conveys the exhausting toll that this
non-stop grind creates. Rapping about the harsh confines of the ghetto is
familiar to Rock, with songs such as “M.O.N.E.Y (feat. J. Black)”, “No Joke (feat. Ab-Soul)”, and “Life’s a
Gamble” off of his first album Follow Me
Home
all describing in vivid detail where he comes from.  

Towards the end of the grim song, he snarls “Had me snatch
that switch off that branch with some leaves on it, fantasizing bout some money
trees on em”. This line ultimately sums up the toxic relationship between the
chase for money in poor cities around the US, and the violence and damage
caused by this pursuit. The fantasized money tree is whipping those in pursuit
of it with the very branches being strained for.

All in all, “Money Trees Deuce” is a fantastic single from
Jay Rock, proving he is more than capable of finding shade in his own trees, no
matter how unforgiving the environment. If you haven’t listen the song already,
it’s definitely worth checking out.

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DJ Holmes

Album Review: Oddisee – The Good Fight

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It’s always admirable when a hip-hop producer can step in front of the mic and demonstrate serious lyrical and vocal talent. Artists like El-P, Flying Lotus, and Madlib got their starts crafting some fantastic beats before trying their hand at rapping, and each has found success on both fronts.

The latest artist to give it a try is D.C.-based artist Oddisee, who has built up quite a bit of hype in his hometown for his various talents. The Good Fight, his second official LP, is Oddisee’s most expansive and fleshed out release yet, displaying a newfound confidence from the MC. He manages to pay tribute to his city’s diverse musical past while also acknowledging current sounds and styles in hip-hop nationwide.

The most immediately noticeable aspect of this project is – of course – Oddisee’s production. The Good Fight is loaded with jazzy instrumentals that are just off-kilter enough to feel cohesive, but not dull. I could imagine someone like Chance the Rapper or Mick Jenkins sounding pretty great over these beats. Horns and acoustic drums are consistent features on this album, and they both help give Oddisee a discernible and recognizable sound.

I was pleasantly surprised by Oddisee’s abilities as an MC. His confessional and personal lyrics go well with his distinct voice and inflections. This isn’t the most creative or original sounding hip-hop album of 2015, but Oddisee deserves praise for the many strengths of The Good Fight. For example, he dismantles hip-hop’s standard 4/4 time signature by rapping in 5/4 on the track “Counter-Clockwise,” and it’s equally disorienting and impressive.

Where Oddisee could use improvement is the album’s hooks, which tend to feel out-of-place or otherwise pale in comparison to the usually dense and lyrical verses. The vocalists he tends to employ are good singers, but the melodies and lyrics on the choruses aren’t nearly as compelling as the production and verses.

Also, not every track on The Good Fight is a winner. The hook on “Meant It When I Said It” is too close to rap punchline G-Eazy’s “I Mean It” for comfort. I also don’t particularly like the outro that follows the last track, on which an unnamed interviewee sings the praises of Oddisee, comparing him to Blu, while also saying hip-hop has lost its replay value. Self-promotion and braggadocio are important parts of hip-hop culture, but it feels weird and superfluous in the context of this album.

Check out the whole album via the Bandcamp stream below:

The Good Fight by Oddisee

All in all, Oddisee impressed me with this album. The production is consistently fantastic, and I love that the beats come off like updates to go-go, an essential D.C. genre. He’s also an ostensibly talented rapper, delivering some of the best bars of his career.

The Good Fight isn’t reinventing the wheel, but it does seem like a significant stepping stone in Oddisee’s career and path to independent hip-hop success. It’s a self-sufficient record that avoids most of the stereotypes involved with most indie hip-hop. It isn’t a “backpacker” record by any means, and I feel like straight-up hip-hop fans will find plenty to enjoy about this album without knowing much about Oddisee or where he comes from. The Good Fight is an admirable effort that doesn’t overstay its welcome or foster any moments of cringe. Oddisee does his thing, he does it well, and then he’s done.

Jakob Ross is a first-time blogger on the Rainy Blawg. You can find him on Last.FM, Twitter, and Tumblr as well as on Rainy Dawg Radio as a DJ! For more posts like this one, check out his music blog, “Jakob’s Album Reviews”

Check out more music and news from Rainy Dawg Radio @ RainyDawg.org!

KnowMads Show Review: Vera Project 5/9/15

As a longtime fan of Seattle rappers, the KnowMads have held
a steady place on my iPod for years. They are one of the main groups that got
me into rap and keyed me into what the scene is like in Seattle. So to say I
was excited when they announced a show at The Vera Project last Saturday, May 9th
would be a bit of an understatement.

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The two members of the KnowMads, Tom Pepe and Tom Wilson, have
been working on solo projects and living in different states, so hearing that
they would be doing a show for their new mixtape KnowMadic was a good sign. Their last project together was their
2012 album The Knewbook, and they
have since announced a Kickstarter for the next album, Knew School.

The Knowmads both attended Roosevelt High School together,
and have been making music together since their debut self-titled album in
2006. Their long career growing and producing music together was evident in
their hour-long set. The duo finished each other’s lines throughout the
concert, beatboxed, and even bounced freestyles off each other in between
songs, with the crowd giving them words to rhyme.

Their track list covered many of the songs off Knowmadic, but also songs from their
individual projects and previous work together, such as Seattle and The KnewBook. All of these songs were delivered with a
pulsing, raw emotion as they paced back and forth on the stage dripping sweat.
Pepe changed shirts a number of times throughout the show, but that didn’t help
much.

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The intensity was palpable throughout. The duo built on the
crowd’s energy when performing tracks like “The River Runs Deep” and “Sidewalkers”,
screaming their verses into the mic as their jugulars bulged. Put simply, there
was a vibrant charisma and history between the two MCs up on stage, and it was
something special to watch.

Those on the other side of the stage got plenty of love as well. We were thanked
multiple times for showing up and creating their steadily growing publicity.
The dedicated stans in the front row had many opportunities to recite lyrics
into the mic when Tom thrust it into the crowd, and there were high 5s all around
the crowded Vera Project. They evidently took advantage of the intimate venue.
As my first concert seeing them, it was special to realize firsthand how
dedicated their local fans are.  

The show felt alive, and that says something for these two
rappers who have been grinding since high schools and are still only in their
early 20s. They still have it, just like they always have.

Definitely checkout the Kickstarter for their new album and
donate if you can. Head over to their website to stream their entire
discography, or their Facebook to stay up-to-date. And if my writing hasn’t
convinced you already, I highly recommend seeing them live next time they do a
show!

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DJ Holmes

Album Review: Esoteric Allusions

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Seattle and hip hop. The two are becoming more and more
connected, thanks in large part to the mainstream success of Macklemore &
Ryan Lewis
, but also due to the strong underground careers of the Blue
Scholars
, Common Market, up and comer Raz Simone, and of course our nostalgic
hero the great Sir-Mix-A-Lot.

Enter NOM Pérignon,
1/5 of the hip-hop collective .nuLOVE.

Recently relocated from Iowa to Seattle, .nuLOVE consists of Boycott, producer Jharee,
NOM Pérignon, Booka, and Freakmite. Jharee handles much of the
production on NOM’s solo album Esoteric Allusions, and the other
group members feature on a few of the tracks as well.

NOM Pérignon, aka Michael Westerfield, calls himself an
artist, lyricist, songwriter, actor, and visionary on their website, and listening to the album from cover to cover provides evidence of how these many titles can be rolled together into one person.

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Esoteric Allusions is
a dark album, as the artwork suggests, and it’s expansive lyrics contain many
references to the artists’ grimy upbringing. Yet NOM’s goal here is to educate.
The project opens with “Allusion”, with a woman’s emotional voice proclaiming
“Let me lay down my words in you so you know how I feel/All I have for you are
layers to peel”. Haunting strings grow to a crescendo, and as the drums blow in
and a melancholy sample is added to the beat, NOM beings his first verse.
Buckle down!

Listening to the album it immediately becomes apparent that
NOM is a gifted lyricist, with frequent wordplay and a skilled use of
alliteration harnessed to a confident flow. On the opener he raps “Soul
searching is the sole source of my sorcery”, and tracks such as “Happy
Feelings_Hopeless Protests”, “Ghetto Boy”, and “Crossroads” provide more than
enough evidence for why such musings create a shady art.

Standout “Bucktown
Blues” is an impressive stream of consciousness where NOM relates multiple
perspectives, of both a frustrated girlfriend and a dealer out of options
making one last phone call, and ends with him explaining that he will rise
above and travel “wherever the wind take me”. The beat is indeed reminiscent of
a chilling, whistling wind, overlaid with a clattering snare.

Jharee’s production throughout the album is superb,
complementing the messages the lyrics deliver and fleshing out the murky nature
of the mixtape. Yet all is not depressing on the album. The mercurial nature of
relations with the opposite sex is addressed on “Good Evening” and Find Your
Loving”, with the latter featuring a stellar verse from Chicago native Freddie Old Soul.

At the beginning of the mixtape, NOM raps “I ease on down
the road less travelled/where it’s way less paved and way more gravel”,
illustrating his struggle to find success coming from a position where success
is not the norm. Esoteric Allusions
may be his first project, but NOM Pérignon has made serious progress in blazing
his own path to find ever-elusive success.

There is much to be taken from this album. I am only
scratching the surface as far as the depth of material covered on the 15
tracks, so I highly recommend downloading the album for free here and seeing for yourself what Seattle has to offer up next in the world of rap.

Also check out .nuLOVE’s website for more of their solo projects, along with their Facebook.
And in the words of this promising new collective’s slogan: Stay Gold.

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DJ Holmes

New Track: Earl Sweatshirt – Solace

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Earl
Sweatshirt
is one of the most talented rappers out right now. He
produces a lot of his own beats and flows over them like none other.

Earl is plagued by
depression. He talks about a lot of his issues in his music. His latest album was aptly
titled I Don’t Like Shit, I Don’t Go
Outside.

With Solace, he bares himself like never
before. Earl dropped Solace on
YouTube earlier this week, without warning. He raps about
his sadness and pain with brutal honesty. Solace is a ten
minute voyage into Earl’s stormy mind. I’ve never heard anything quite like it,
simultaneously stark and beautiful.

The YouTube
description for Solace is succinct: “music from when i hit the bottom and found something.”
There isn’t a video to accompany the song. There’s just a plain, pink square
for us to stare at.

Solace doesn’t have a hook. It doesn’t
need one. Haunting instrumentals ebb and flow and transform. Earls three verses
are mostly mumbled and slurry, to good effect. His voice conveys his
hopelessness better than any words could.

Which
isn’t to say that the lyrics here aren’t powerful. Bars like “I spent days
faded and anemic/You
could see it in my face, I ain’t been eating, I’m just wasting away” and “My
brain split in two,
it’s raining a bit/I hope
it’s a monsoon, my face in the sink” are visual and cutting.

The
piano-heavy instrumentals create a dark, claustrophobic vibe. Disembodied moans
mingle with eerie chords. Shrill screeches pierce through, at points. Despite
all the melancholy elements, the beats are as smooth as melted butter. Earl’s production never ceases to impress.

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Earl
is mired in regret and it keeps him up at night: “I done stayed up the whole
night…It’s me and my nibbling conscience.” He misses his dead grandma: “I got
my grandmama’s hands, I start to cry
when I see ‘em/Cause they remind me
of seeing her”

Earl’s
honesty pays off, because Solace is real
and relatable. The YouTube comments section is full of praise for Earl. Some
commenters even thank Earl for Solace. It
“strikes a chord” and “speaks volumes.”

Do
yourself a favor and give Solace a
listen. It’s amazing.

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Pranav Shivanna

birthday shoutout: Jermaine Lamarr Cole

it’s January 28th, so you know what that means.

and if you don’t know what that means, it’s rapper J. Cole’s birthday!

i’ve been following J. Cole since he released Friday Night Lights in 2010, so when he dropped 2014 Forest Hills Drive, i was ecstatic (probably an understatement).

and, with good reason. the album grew on me a lot, and i still listen to it pretty religiously, though it’s been out for over a month now.  i’ve gotta hand it to J. Cole, this album is, in my mind, a classic. i’m a sucker for clever wordplay, catchy beats, and Cole-style oversharing, so i guess it’s no surprise i feel this way.

since the album came out, i’ve been trying to write a “review” of sorts. i’ve jotted thoughts on each song, analyzed lyrics, yadda yadda yadda. and i have GIVEN UP. i can’t do it. it’s so hard to review something that you feel like no matter how many times you listen to it, you learn more about it and recognize new things, because whenever you start to review, you feel like you’re shortchanging the artist (i promise this is not just me).

so i’ve decided to “review” the album in a different way that speaks to its strengths: i’ve chosen my favorite* lyrics from each song. and i’m gonna share them. i’m doing this because if you haven’t listened to the album, you will definitely want to after catching this quick peek into the songs.

*my favorite for now, that is

here goes:

1. “Intro” 
“do you wanna be, free / Free from pain, free from scars / Free to sing, free from bars”

2. “January 28th”
“What’s the price for a black man life? / I check the toe tag, not one zero in sight”

3. "Wet Dreamz" 
“I’m thinking how that body look naked when you laying on the bed / Teacher, please don’t make me stand up”

4. "03’ Adolescence”  
“I got food for your thoughts to soothe your soul / If you see my tears fall just let me be /Move along, nothing to see”

5. "A Tale of 2 Citiez"  
“Anybody is a killer, all you gotta do is push ‘em to the limits / Fuck being timid in the Civic politicin’ with the pushers and the pimps”

6. "Fire Squad”
“While silly niggas argue over who gon’ snatch the crown / Look around, my nigga, white people have snatched the sound”

7. "St. Tropez" 
“Lately / It’s been hard for me to smile”

8. "G.O.M.D.“ 
"Why every rich black nigga gotta be famous / Why every broke black nigga gotta be brainless”

9. "No Role Modelz"  
“But then I thought back, back to a better me / Before I was a B-list celebrity / Before I started callin’ bitches "bitches” so heavily / Back when you could get a platinum plaque without no melody"

10. “Hello”  
“Reflection bring regrets don’t it / Rejection makes you defensive / So you protect your pride with your reflexes”

11. “Apparently" 
"Keep up, never sure where the words would take me / Niggas eat em up, and regurgitate me”

12.“Love Yourz" 
"It’s beauty in the struggle, ugliness in the success / Hear my words or listen to my signal of distress”

13. “Note to Self" *** 
“I don’t mind cuz I don’t matter”

*** side note: this is the, as Cole calls it, role credits. so it ends in a long monologue and he references Jonah Hill & Dale Earnhardt Jr. as playing a part in the album, and right after says:  "I’m just fuckin’ playin’, I don’t know either one of those two dudes. I don’t know either one of them niggas, I was in the moment. I just lied, I don’t give a fuck.“ that’s my favorite part of the whole album because he is so damn goofy, even after how awesomely deep and real the other songs were, and it’s just cool to see his personality displayed through talking, not even rapping. <3

hopefully this makes you want to listen to the album, or if you already have, maybe you like it more now. 😉 

happy january 28th! 

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xoxo, gnovs