Playlist: Puget Sounds

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Part of the reason why I chose to move to Seattle was the music scene (sorry Mom and Dad, the libraries and museums are pretty nice, too!). The city is a haven for hip-hop, grunge, indie-rock, and basically everything else. Nothing makes me happier than really getting into a new artist, only to find out they’re from Seattle. So much good stuff is goin’ on in the Puget Sound Region that I just had to put a playlist together showcasing it.

Not all of the artists are from Seattle; Modest Mouse is from Issaquah, and the little-known band Beach Vacation hails from Oak Harbor on Whidbey Island. I’ll admit, I cheated a little: bands like Manatee Commune, Death Cab for Cutie, and ODESZA are from Bellingham, but I figured that they rep Washington enough to make the cut. 

The playlist features songs from throughout the history of the Seattle scene (How was I supposed to leave out Jimi Hendrix or Sir Mix-A-Lot?). Some bands consist of former Huskies (Beat Connection, Blue Scholars, Hey Marseilles, etc) who even have some songs about the U-District. Since I’m continually adding new songs to the playlist, feel free to follow it on Spotify.

Looking back on my first year in the Emerald City, I’m super grateful to live in a place with so much musical history and such a vibrant scene. I hope that you are, too. Enjoy.

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Ann Evans



Check out more music and news from Rainy Dawg Radio @ RainyDawg.org!

Sasquatch! 2015: The Lineup

It’s here! The lineup for Sasquatch! has finally been released! This annual music festival is held at the Gorge Amphitheater in George, Washington every Memorial Day weekend. That’s May 22-May 25; mark your calendars!

Every year thousands of music lovers from all over the world flock to The Gorge for this festival. Known for it’s scenic back drop and diverse lineup, Sasquatch! has become a gathering spot for fans of all types of music.

Check it out-

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This year the festival is featuring headliners Kendrick Lamar, Led Zeppelin legacy Robert Plant, Modest Mouse and Lana Del Ray. Personally, though, I’m looking forward to seeing St. VincentSylvan Esso, Thunderpussy and Dan Mangan + Blacksmith

Still not convinced? Get this: Sasquatch! is also known for its comedy side-shows. This year’s list includes names like Doug Benson, Leslie Jones, Cameron Esposito and more. 

Great music and funny people? Sasquatch! 2015 is a no-brainer; count me in.

Looking for the perfect opportunity to submerge yourself into Washington’s beautiful greenery, too? You’re in luck. Considering this venue is pretty remote and there aren’t any huge cities nearby, most of the festival attendees choose to campout in the designated camping ground near the amphitheater. 

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Tickets will be on sale starting February 7 on the festival website and a regular 4-day pass will cost $350. Grab yours before they sell out!

I’ll see you out there (stay tuned for tomorrow’s post, DJ Desman reviews the Sasquatch Launch Party)

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nilorap

Rad Report: Modest Mouse isn’t being too modest!–reissuing of two albums

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Yo all you Rainy Dawgs out there! This is the Rad Report with blogger Rad Rebs, and before we get down and dirty with some awesome new details about Modest Mouse’s reissuing of their first two LPs, we’re about to get slightly philosophical so bare with me. Its been said that “bad news comes, don’t you worry even when it lands good news will work its way to all them plans” (Modest Mouse, “Float On”). This resonates with me as I float into a new world, full of changes and new experiences. On a broader and wider spectrum, it’s only human to wonder when our luck will take a turn for the better—into the utopian-esque world that we tend to imagine. No matter which point we are at in our lives, it seems to be inevitable that we will face a wave of challenges; at any given moment we may experience the “bad news” that Modest Mouse refers to, but just as often we find ourselves in a state of euphoria in the next instant.

We can relate to Modest Mouse in many ways as being their fellow Washingtonians—the lead singer (Isaac Brock) originally grew in Issaquah just east of the UW campus. Although growing up poor, Brock formed the band in the early nineties and received a lot of luck with their first two LPs released in 1996 and 1997 respectively.

We’ll all be considering ourselves pretty lucky starting on October 28th, when Modest Mouse’s This Is a Long Drive for Someone with Nothing to Think About is reissued on vinyl—and AGAIN on November 4th when The Lonesome Crowded West is reissued. In a world where digital has become the norm, there still seems to be an agreement that listening to an album on vinyl has a charming sound unlike anything else. When we step back and take a moment to realize that this is the first time in over ten years that these albums have been available on vinyl, I’m predicting a pretty serious rush on these reissues. Can’t wait to get my Modest Mouse on vinyl–as Isaac Brock might sing, good news is definitely working its way to all them plans.

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Rad Rebs

More info below:

http://www.rollingstone.com/music/artists/modest-mouse/biography

http://impressionofsound.com/index.php/news/490-modest-mouse-to-reissue-first-two-albums

http://consequenceofsound.net/2014/09/modest-mouse-to-reissue-first-two-albums-with-unreleased-music/

Outlander in the Emerald City: Lync – These Are Not Fall Colors (Flashback Album Review)

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Formed in 1992, Lync was one of the pioneers of the indie rock scene that grew out of Olympia and Seattle in the early- to mid-1990s.  Comprised of vocalist/guitarist Sam Jayne, bassist/vocalist James Bertram, and drummer Dave Schneider, Lync’s strengths encompass discordant riffs, intertwining guitar and bass melodies and a heavy, driving beat to keep the ground solid underneath.  Jayne’s vocals are beautifully indistinct while maintaining a screechiness that is bound to make your head ache delightfully.  With only one full album under their belt, These Are Not Fall Colors showcases the band in a head-bang worthy package, drawing comparisons to hardcore favorites such as Fugazi and Unwound.

Where to listen: The full album can be found on YouTube (streaming after the jump)

Where to buy: Check out Lync’s bandcamp (http://lync1994.bandcamp.com/album/these-are-not-fall-colors) if you like what you hear!

The album opens with “B”, beginning with a bombardment of feedback extending into a melodically brooding riff and rolling drumbeat, wasting no time in showcasing Lync’s talents in the post-hardcore vein.  The song takes off into a soaring barrage of distortion and chunky rhythms, with Jayne double-tracking his screaming vocals over the chorus.  Although the lyrics maintain an ambiguous quality throughout the song (and most of the album for that matter), a few profound lines shine through, including the repeated “You only need your own air to breathe.”  Lync’s influences can be easily traced back to classics like Pixies and Sonic Youth with their use of the (now almost-clichéd) alt-rock loud/soft dynamic; however, they implement it differently, often giving breathing room in the chorus while still never losing intensity in the verses.  “Silverspoon Glasses” is no exception to this rule, featuring swelling walls of distortion that collapse into haunting yet beautiful melodies.  The album continues with the supremely catchy “Cue Cards”, featuring the classic off-kilter arpeggio and rolling drumbeat combination, with a bass-line to guide the major melodies, a trick peers Modest Mouse picked up (and perfected) in their first few records.  The last track, “Uberrima Fides,” allows the album to close out with a bang, climaxing to a kick-ass buildup before the reverb-drenched outro jam (which takes its guitar effects from space-rock gods Caustic Resin and Built to Spill).  The feedback at the end of the track allows the album to fade out as it began, ready to be replayed and re-appreciated by its fans.  Although twenty years have passed since its release, These Are Not Fall Colors remains a highly influential record in the indie rock scene that has grown to such great heights in our alt-loving society of today

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Katie Hanford