Flor:  A Better Opener

So, a few weeks ago a few friends and I went to go see Hayley Kiyoko live. The performance was at the wonderful Crocodile in downtown Seattle (although the roof was leaking??) and we were excited to see the show. We got there praying there wouldn’t be an opener, we just wanted to get straight to the Hayley Kiyoko part of the night. But there was an opener, of course, the upcoming band Flor. To our surprise, Flor blew us away with their music and stage presence – they rocked our socks right off. Surely, we thought, Hayley would top them by leaps and bounds – this wasn’t the case. Hayley Kiyoko was fine, she got the job done but all in all she was a beautiful mess. The show felt unprofessional, and I’d describe her stage presence and remarks thereof as a long Tumblr text post I did not want to read. So, this blog is gonna be about Flor, because I fell in love with them. Sorry Hayley.

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Although Flor has just only started touring and doing large live performances, they still managed to impress us. The lead singer, Zach, was adorable and so awesome and kind to the audience. He had sort of a cute and quirky way of getting us pumped up. After their first few songs he thanked the audience, “Thank you guys for applauding, you really didn’t have to. It could’ve been totally silent, and I just wanna thank you guys for the applause”. I hope that in the future, if Flor gets big, that he doesn’t lose this thankfulness to a jaded look at fame and performance.
All four members of the band had a stage presence that played off one another, they worked as a cohesive organism that made awesome rock sounds. Not only was their stage presence just fantastic, so was their music. The indie and high voice of the singer was the perfect complement to the airy indie rock music flow they had going on. They did a really cool rock style performance of Adele’s “Send my Love (to your new lover)” that you can watch here:

All in all the concert rocked, and it was really worth it to see Flor – oh, and Hayley Kiyoko was there too. I ended up buying this sick hat from the Flor merch, I liked them so much.

<3 Zach Krieger

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Show Review: Shlohmo in Seattle

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I’ve
been a Shlohmo fan for years now,
so I bought tickets to his show as soon as he announced a tour. That was way back around
the start of the year.

I whiled away the months
leading to the show by revisiting his impressive discography. I’ve long
considered his Laid Out EP to be a
masterpiece.

In March, Shlohmo dropped his new album, Dark Red. The
album was a stunning departure from his previous releases. But it still had all
those classic Shlohmo elements, like menacing basslines and warped notes.
Definitely an album worth checking out.

Shlohmo’s electronic
music isn’t the dance-y kind. His music reminds me of dark basements and scary
nights and pain and zombie apocalypses. It’s pretty great. That’s why I was
surprised when I started dancing at the show. Everyone was dancing. It was
probably because Shlohmo’s basslines were even more immense on Neumos’s bumping sound system. Shout
out my ear drums for not exploding.

I love it when electronic
artists bring out a band. Shlohmo brought out a drummer and a guitarist and
also occasionally wielded a guitar himself.

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The light show was crazy
intense. The lights and the music complemented each other beautifully, surging
and receding in harmony. At times, shrouded by the spotlights, Shlohmo seemed angelic.

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He mostly played cuts off
his new album, but didn’t forget fan favorites like Places and Later. Later is my favorite Shlohmo song ever.
I cried sweet tears of joy when it came on. Well, maybe not. Nonetheless, I was
super happy.

About an hour into the
set, Shlohmo and the band just ran off the stage without warning. “Is that it?”
I wondered.

Hell no. The lights flared
up and Shlohmo ran back up on stage. He grabbed the microphone and reassured us,
“That was a joke. This is real life now!” He played us one last amazing song.
Then, unfortunately, it was over.

My one beef with the show
was that the two openers, Purple and
Nick Melons, had sets that lasted
about an hour each. That’s a bit long, as openers go. I was restless, standing
on sore feet waiting for Shlohmo to come out. But the openers were pretty tight
so it was cool I guess.

Definitely a night to
remember.  

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Pranav Shivanna

Throwback Thursday: Mikky Ekko / HAERTS Show (Ani Joon Review)

Something you may have missed over the break… Rainy Dawg Radio’s Ani Joon is sonically enlightened by Mikky Ekko’s performance in Seattle.

A local performance review (featuring audio and video from the show)!

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Ania Kamkar

Ani Joon Review: G-Eazy show & backstage Blizzy interview in Seattle!

Our very own Ani Joon attends a show, takes some pictures, and chats up a drummer. Check out her vlog-tastic review (above) and snaps below:

Image set by Ania Kamkar

Weekly Digs: Ted Lucas: The Om Album

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Ted Lucas got his start as a studio musician and member of various folk/rock bands around the Midwest. A classically trained guitar player, Lucas also studied blues, country, jazz, and contemporary music and drew inspiration from the likes of Ravi Shankar to develop a beautiful sound of his own. In 1974 he released his only album, a self titled effort recorded largely in his attic studio that has come to be known as “The Om Album”.

The two sides of the album are quite distinct from each other. Side A consists of a gorgeous medley of six folk songs, while Side B contains three longer, more instrumental jams. In the first six tracks, Lucas develops beautiful and familiar melodies with his perfectly soft guitar playing and warm, open voice. In a way that makes you think Bon Iver must be a fan, Lucas crafts intricate harmonies with himself that settle themselves in your head all day but never wear on you; his music is comfortable.

Get a taste of the music by listening to a track from Lucas’ self-titled album:

The lyrics of his songs are simple and direct, smiling out of the songs at you. In the album’s opener he sings “It’s a plain and sane and simple melody/brings a song to you, brings some joy to me”, setting the tone for the album as a whole. The next three tracks, “It’s So Easy”, “Now That I Know”, and “I’ll Find A Way” are all intricate and touching in their own way and as you’re listening you keep expecting a let down, like how can it stay this good??

Then Lucas comes at you with “Baby Where You Are” and “It’s So Nice To Get Stoned”, tracks that are irresistibly excellent. Side B showcases Lucas’ guitar talent, especially on “Sonny Boy Blues”, a seven minute long rail against over drinking, and the closer “Love & Peace Raga”. The raga is played in a traditional Indian style; intricately picking it’s way along for nearly eight minutes, weaving together melodies, and creating a gorgeous tapestry of sound.

This album is an absolute gem from start to finish, and while it sadly never got the attention it deserved, I get the sense that Ted Lucas was not a man concerned with material gains. So take a few minutes and give it a listen, you won’t be disappointed. Yoga Records put out a reissue in 2010 which can be found on iTunes or Amazon.

Here’s another track from the reissue to keep you company:

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Jamie Coughlin