Tag Archives: Pop

AURORA’s Empyrean Essence is More Encouragement Than Despair

While I am delighted over and over again by the discovery of
new artists, I am rarely plunged into an inspiration that alters my outlook
on the world. But such a rare captivation did consume me this week, and
19-year-old Norwegian Aurora Aksnes was responsible. 

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My first exposure to AURORA
was her cover of Oasis’s “Half
the World Away” featured in this year’s poignantly wonderful John Lewis Christmas advert.
(This wildly popular video catapulted AURORA to number 11 on the UK charts, and
helped publicize her European tour.)  

Though
the story in this advert held most of my attention, I couldn’t help but notice
the pure character and exceptional pitch of the singer giving voice to the commercial.
I did a quick search to find the song and artist and blessed YouTube directed
me to her music video “Runaway”. I sincerely hope you have never heard this
song before, because watching it in conjunction with the video yields to
something much more ethereal than experiencing either form in isolation.  

If you’re more interested in melancholy acoustic sounds, she’s
mastered that domain as well, with arresting visuals to match. “Murder Song (5,
4, 3, 2, 1)” is gritty and raw, and its music video featuring black-and-white
butterflies fluttering around a tortured AURORA is mesmerizing.  

Both these delicately desolate videos capture feelings that pertinently
embody the coldest season of the year. I intend to put AURORA on all my wintertime
playlists (including Christmas Carols, because “Half the World Away” decidedly
counts as one now that it’s been in a Christmas commercial.)  

On December 4th AURORA posted a celebratory photo
to her her exclusive fan community, “Warriors and Weirdos”,
with the caption “We’ve finished the record!! Magnus, O.
Martin and me are going out for some sushi. It’s a sushi kind of day today.” (Her charming personality is
an added bonus to the insider access of being a member on this page.) Sadly,
this post doesn’t indicate much about the forthcoming album’s U.S. release date.
But you can keep yourself apprised by following her Twitter, Facebook and aesthetically splendid
Instagram accounts.

If you are hesitant to check out AURORA’s live videos
because of her adolescence and inexperience with the stage, I would urge you to
overcome that reservation. She is both impressive and adorable live, as
evidenced by this set for NPR:

AURORA is as cosmically stunning as the natural phenomenon that
shares her name. She is a vocal and visual wonder whose brilliant (and
self-written) songs simultaneously transport listeners to the majestic vistas
of Norway and the darkest depths of human suffering. But AURORA does not cast
sadness in a troublesome light. She handles it gently and imaginatively, with an
artful acknowledgement of its inevitable impact on our lives. This is why listening
to her music is not a depressing escapism, but a stirring reimagining
of the tumultuous and beautiful privilege it is to be alive.  

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DJ M-Schizzle



Check out more music and news from Rainy Dawg Radio @ RainyDawg.org!

New Release: Kaptan’s Sprinter EP

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If you know me, you know that I’m always looking for new indie pop that I can belt out in the shower (or in public…). This week, while scrolling on the new releases page on Spotify, I found Sprinter EP by Kaptan. I’d never heard of the band, and, as it turns out, not a lot of people have, either. However, after listening to the new release, I knew that this band was going places. 

The EP starts out with “Way Out”, a catchy, upbeat tune with a sugary sweet riff that makes you want to dance in the same way as Wild Cub’s “Thunder Clatter”. “Everything” sounds like the perfect summer tune that you want to sing from the rooftops. “Closer Now” takes a much slower, more sultry position on the EP, featuring lots of layered vocals.

The entire EP definitely sounds like something a well-known indie pop band would be releasing, which just goes to show how much potential Kaptan has. Despite having less than 600 likes on Facebook, it seems like their Spotify exposure will be viral. They already have 260,000 monthly listeners, even though the EP only dropped five days ago.

The only place I’ve been able to find the EP so far is on Spotify, but stay tuned for Kaptan’s tracks to hit iTunes or SoundCloud soon. 

(By the way, according to their Facebook page, the band is from Seattle, so that means you pretty much have no reason not to listen to them.)

For fans of: Grizfolk, Wild Cub, Pacific Air, MisterWives

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Ann Evans



Check out more music and news from Rainy Dawg Radio @ RainyDawg.org!

New Release Watch: Made in Heights

The West Coast duo consisting of former wedding singer, Kelsey Bulkin, and local Seattle-based producer of Blue Scholars, Sabzi, released the single “Slow Burn” on Tuesday.  It’s the second single off their upcoming album (out May 26th) Without My Enemy What Would I Do. And I’m a little disappointed.  

I want to start off by saying Made in Heights is an amazing group. Attempting to label their sound as a whole proves difficult, seeing as they have yet to accept any one genre themselves.  Continuously welcoming suggestions from fans, the current official description includes: mythical filth, pop fiction, beauty slap, goon lit, artisanal (c/t)rap, and west coast gothic. To put it as simply as I can, they are known for pairing soulful vocals with crisp electronic beats and atmospheric soundscapes.  At times even incorporating elements of rap into their bright and ethereal sound, Made in Heights weaves an intricate and special sound under the ever-growing umbrella of synth-pop. The only way to truly experience the sound is to hear it for your self, something I highly recommend.

Slow Burn turns its back on this complexity of genres and heads straight for the dance floor.  Let me get one thing straight – this track is completely infectious and a solid dancy-synth-poppy song.  The track begins with a catchy synthesized staccato baseline with Kelsey’s simmering vocals drifting atop. By the end, snapping and groovy instrumentals layer in, creating an intoxicating, sparkly-smooth pop track. I would be lying if I said I didn’t bob my head to “you give me that burn, burn, burn, burn, burn”.  It’s received good reviews from several sources and is now one of their most-listened to songs on Spotify, it just isn’t what I was hoping for.

Listen for yourself in the stream below:

It might be a personal taste issue that turned me off the new single, seeing as the airy female vocals and snappy dance beat of Slow Burn kicked in some post-traumatic stress from my days working in retail.  Once you imagine a song bursting from the cheap speakers of a former employer at the mall, it’s hard to listen to it without feeling a little bit guilty.

It also could be the high expectations I hold for the duo, set by their stunning previous work. Ever since first hearing "All the Places” and “Wildflowers” off of their 2012 self-titled album, I’ve been craving more.  Even their opening act for TOKiMONSTA I attended in LA last October reflected their original aesthetic I adore, the pair performing synchronized 60’s backup singer dance moves throughout the set. I just hold them up to a higher creative standard than what this newest track has produced. With sporadic releases and no single website to find their collective work (scattered throughout Soundcloud, Spotify, Bandcamp and their website), I was overjoyed to hear about the new album coming out in late May.

Now I’m just hoping that this single follows the rule of singles, and is the lone shamelessly-dancey track of the album; the rest hopefully following more in suit with the innovative sounds I’ve come to expect from Made in Heights.

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Cassie Lynch

Celebrate, celebrate: Holiday Mountain

New musicians are back, let’s dive in and straight up dig it. Holiday Mountain, anyone?

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Holiday Mountain is a band that is completely out of the realm of genre. Synth pop fused with dubstep fused with the meaningful lyricism of soul? It’s trippy.
Which is not a bad thing, we need some more unique eclectic sounds in our lives. Based in Austin, Texas, Holiday Mountain dub themselves as musicians that push musical boundaries, mixing dances beats, unexpected melodies, and airy vocals.

And it’s true, they’re unconventional for sure.

Taking a look at their recently released EP You be You, Part 1, there is a lot going on that you almost wonder, and “How did they come up with this?”

Number one track off their EP “My Body” is so bizarre sounding with a mix of front woman Laura Patino half rapping her lyrics “Don’t need no hates/If you ain’t down, I’ll see you later,” to underlying synth beats and heavy percussion. This group does their own sound, and they make that known to you straight up coming to the album, regarding their unconventional sound.

But you come to get used to the way Holiday Mountain mixes their sound by the time you get to sweet tracks like “Slow Motion Things,” with tangy vocals, poignant instrumental riffs, and musical timing that ironically parallels the theme of the song.

There are funky beats, and there are rich vocals for sure. You’ve got hints of Diplo and M.I.A. with the electronic dance groove and hip hop influence, but Holiday Mountain does have one distinction.

Although their sound is crazy, the themes behind their lyricism are beautiful and empowering. With lyrics like “It’s my body/Don’t need no haters” and “Equal freedom for woman and man,” you can’t help but feel inspired regarding gender equality and female empowerment. Not something typical to normal synth-pop right?

My favorite track off the entire EP is “With You” (featuring Wild Child), and that isn’t due to just the slower tempo and more ethereal sounding vocals. It’s about self-love, but it’s also about love in general and the beautiful feelings that comes with love. There is a very airy feel to the entire track as Patino sings “With you, I am young/With you, I am free.” The layered vocals with the softer percussion and overlay of violin is beautiful. It’s a little hippie, with the underlying chorus and synth, but it’s a beautiful end to the EP, and makes you wistful for just a little bit more. 

It’s nice seeing the versatility of these musicians, purely because not everyone can necessarily automatically groove to Holiday Mountain’s aggressive dance jams. But at the same time, not everyone may not want to sit and mellow out to a more airy, acoustic tune either.

They’ve got a little bit of everything, and that’s what matter when they’re singing about themes of self-love, empowerment, and overall acceptance—something we can all relate to.

You Be You, Part 1, available here to jam to. Go groove.

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Ariana Rivera

Dreamy German duos: Milky Chance

Hey, hey, hey, hey friends. Sometimes it’s good to acknlowledge oldies as goodies.

So let’s just talk about Milky Chance.

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A German folk duo with reggae and electronic music influences made up of Clemens Rehbein
(vocals and instrumentals) and Philipp Dausch (production and DJing),
Milky Chance is badass. Their album, Sadnecessary,
released just last year in October, has 11 tracks that you will either love or
hate. I don’t really think there’s really an in between with Milky Chance. They’re
chilled out dance pop, they’re a German folk jazz duo. It’s hard.

 “Stolen
Chance,” a more upbeat tempo track is the song that made it for Milky Chance,
is catchy with a dance beat of synchronistic claps, funky bass, and on- beat
drums. The vocals are more harmonious, and the -lyrics instantly just get
anyone to groove, with Rehbein crooning, “And I want you/We can bring it on the floor/You’ve never danced like this
before/We dont talk about it/Dancin’ on do the boogie all night long/ Stoned in
paradise, shouldn’t talk about it.” It’s chill, but it’s a boogie song with an
electro-tech vibe finishing out the song.

Rehbein has a
very distinct vocal style, and production wise, the two create this blend of
folk, reggae, and pop with almost this electronic aspect thrown in there for
kicks. “Flashed Junk Mind”  and “Stunner”
on Sadnecessary are some easily
the most relaxed tracks on the album, delivering beautiful broken up rhythms
and scratchy, raspy vocals.  Quickly, you
learn to discover the aesthetic of Milky Chance and you wonder if their sound
will become repetitive and old. But then there’s tracks like “Becoming,” that
instantly give you vibes of old Southern jazz, mixed with indie folk, and
you realize there’s no way Milky Chance can bore you.

The best track of the album is easily “Down by the River.”  Rehbein’s scratchy croons of his lyrics of “Down
by the river, I
was drawn by your grace/ Into tempest of oblivion and to the Lovers place"
overlaying some rhythmically guitar melodies.

It’s probably a song that is the most pop on the album, but has good rhythm and sound.In comparison to “Feathers” and “Sweet Sun” has a sense of dissonance and non-conforming rhythm. It’s free-flowing, it’s a song you listen to when you just don’t care anymore.

I’m not going to lie, I definitely don’t listen to these
guys for their lyrical creativity. It’s lacking a little in that department. It’s
their instrumental rhythms that I love, and I can admit, I love the sound of
Rehbein’s raspy vocals, reminiscent to me of  The Tallest Man on Earth. These guys have already gotten big, but
if you’re fan of vocally distincty Gotye, or the instrumentally dreamy XX, you’ll like this German sound.

They’re on tour this year, so if you have tickets already to
see them somewhere throughout the U.S., then you’re a cool cat. Boogie to “Stolen
Dance” for me.

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Ariana Rivera

Quick, what’s cool? JUNGLE

We should kick it with Jungle.

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So these guys are not what I usually cover, lots like Doja Cat. They’re
funky and psychedelic and have this element of retro, disco dance pop, but they’ve
got soul. This isn’t all natural acoustic, it’s very artificial, but they’ve
got these reminiscent elements of other funky co cats like Electric Light Orchesta,
MGMT,
the Bee Gees, and maybe even Prince.

It’s hard to categorize. They are hard to put into a box. What do I want to say? Indie electro R&B? Modern
soul? I don’t you know, you decide for yourself.

“Time,” a track that I particularly like on
their 12-track debut album, Jungle
(which released just this past July), is on the lighter dance pop side of their
album.  I think their best part is their
chorus of  “Say it again/Just hold on tight/Don’t let in,
yeah/I’ll run alright/Don’t let me/Oh just let it out,” but not for their
lyrical creativity. This song, like every other song on the radio is computer
generated, filled to the brim with pinched falsettos, slap bass, and crazy
instrumentals. It’s euphoric and filled with funk.

These guys also just make great music videos!

And for the most part, that’s how a lot of this album works. I’m not
getting the sense that these guys really dig their fake horns and electric
funk. They like getting people to want to get up and groove. And  I dig that. What they do lack, however, is a
sense of creativity. Lyrically, it’s very repetitive, and even composition
wise, “Busy Earning” is so similar to “Time,” as is “The Heat” and “Platoon.”
It gets to all be the same.

Is this bad? Yes and no. Jungle is new duo, made up of childhood friends, Tom
McFarland and Josh Lloyd-Watson. They’ve been kicking it since they were nine
years old. I can sense the chemistry, and I’m glad the two are working
together, I like their vibe. Creatively, they have a long way to go,  but they’re old enough producers to realize
that the debut album that they do have is solid and work their way up

We do get a little something different when we hit tracks like “Drops” and “Julia.”
There’s some more bass in there, and instead of just dance funk, it’s gets a
little soulful and mournful. I love when “Drops” hits, “I’ve been loving you
too long.” I’m getting some tastes of Paolo
Nutini
-esque blues in there, and I like the turn from dance pop to some
serious soul.

“Julia,” is the best track on their debut in my opinion and I think a track
they put some serious effort it. I love the overlaying, faded vocals, that
goddamn organ playing in the background, and the rhythm they’ve got going. It’s
a little darker, it isn’t really a song to groove to, but it’s a lovesick,
lovelorn track where I can fully see where these guys are going. They’ve can do
downbeat jazz.

And their video, choreographically is amazing. These guys like modern
dance. Check it.

They’re disco, and they’re not really disco. They’re funk and soul and
electric. They’re party music at times, and then at other times, they’re jams
you have existential conversations to. They start their South American tour soon and I’m bitter I won’t be in Santiago, Chile jamming out, but I hope when they release some new grooves, I’ll be with them live.

Check out their album on Spotify. It’s a solid debut, they’re solid
Londoners. And they make solid music videos, which is what’s important, right?

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Ariana Rivera



Check out more music and news from Rainy Dawg Radio @ RainyDawg.org!

New Track: Blur – Go Out

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Lunar New Year’s celebrations don’t typically include a ‘90s Britpop band announcing a new album at a Chinese restaurant in London. But that’s exactly what happened on the first day of the holiday this year, with Blur revealing the title of their eighth studio album, The Magic Whip, and sharing the first song from it, “Go Out.” So gong hei fat choy to all the Britpop fans out there, I guess.

Hopes for new Blur album have been floating around since their reunion in 2009 and were further fueled by the release of a few new singles in the years since. Such hopes appeared to be confirmed with the news that the band recorded fifteen new songs during their 2013 Hong Kong tour, but singer Damon Albarn was quick to quash any overly optimistic thoughts by suggesting the sessions would end up as “one of those records that never comes out.” The members of the group seemed busy enough with other projects anyway, such as recording solo material, making cheese, and writing a musical based on Alice in Wonderland.

Few were expecting the surprise announcement of The Magic Whip, including possibly Blur themselves. But after polishing up the Hong Kong tracks, the first Blur album in twelve years was ready to go, with the recording location inspiring its cover and announcement location.

The first track to be revealed, “Go Out,” sounds in line with Blur’s later material. The noise of those post-Britpop albums is present here, though that’s not to say that there aren’t any hooks: the chorus, with its vocal hook, has already wriggled its way into my head. Meanwhile, Albarn’s contemptuous lyrics about “the greed go-getter con” show that he hasn’t grown too much more complacent with modern life since the ‘90s, when he sang about it was “rubbish.” On the whole, “Go Out” isn’t too wild of a departure for Blur, but that doesn’t mean we’ll be able to say that about the entire album. After all, Albarn has branched out quite a bit in his work with Gorillaz (and countless other projects), as has guitarist Graham Coxon with his own solo music. It’ll be interesting to see what other directions the band will take on The Magic Whip.

In keeping with the Hong Kong theme, the lyric video for “Go Out” features gratuitous Chinese and, for some reason, an ice cream recipe. You could maybe try making it yourself while you wait for The Magic Whip to come out on April 29th, and you can pre-order it in your format of choice here.

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LeAnn Nguyen

Artist Profile: EXID

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I’ve been listening to a lot of South Korean pop lately, and as anyone who follows K-pop can tell you, things move pretty quickly in that world. You could say this is the case with pop music in general, but it’s especially true for K-pop because the field is so crowded—to give you an idea, in 2014, 47 new boy groups and 56 new girl groups made their debuts on the K-pop scene. I have absolutely no idea about how many groups or solo acts are currently active in total, but judging by those figures, I’m sure it’s an impressive number. So, if a release doesn’t immediately attract the listening public’s attention, chances aren’t good that it will make much of an impression at all. There are, of course, exceptions to this rule—take EXID, for example.

EXID were formed in 2011 as a six-member girl group, and their debut single, the glossy electropop track “Whoz That Girl,” charted at a respectable position of 36 on Korea’s national Gaon Singles Chart. Following the departure of three original members in 2012 (who would later go on to form BESTie, another solid girl group), two new members were added to create EXID’s final five-member lineup: vocalists Hani, Solji, and Hyerin, and rappers LE and Junghwa (as with many groups, these roles aren’t strict). Two more singles released in 2012, the dancefloor-ready “I Feel Good” and the mellower “Every Night,” charted at numbers 56 and 43, respectively. Again, these are pretty good positions, considering the thick competition in K-pop. And their first mini-album, Hippity Hop, even peaked at a position as high as number 13.

The latest single, “Up & Down,” seemed to be a bit of disappointment upon its initial release in August 2014; it entered the Gaon Chart at number 94 before quietly slipping off it. Such a fate isn’t surprising for many K-pop releases, but as it turns out, the story of “Up & Down” didn’t end there. In October, a fan-recorded video of EXID performing the track went viral in Korea, garnering millions of views. As is usually the case on the internet, no one knows exactly what caused the video’s spike in popularity—it could’ve been the members’ sexy dancing, stylish outfits, or impressive live performance abilities, to name a few reasons that were thrown around. Personally, I think it most has to do with people realizing that “Up & Down” is just a killer song. The rap lines, delivered with attitude by LE, are contrasted by singing lines that resemble schoolyard chants in their simplistic melodies. The addition of a brassy sax intro, a propulsive chorus, and a finale that combines all of this makes “Up & Down” an insanely catchy song. And it finally got its due attention:  “Up & Down” climbed back into the charts, eventually hitting number one in the last week of 2014. Not bad for a months-old track, to say the least.

EXID opened 2015 with a victory lap, performing “Up & Down” on Korea’s competitive TV music shows and picking up six #1 awards, their first wins since debuting. To top these successes off, they also won the Hot Trend of the Year Award at the Gaon Chart K-Pop Awards that took place a couple weeks ago. The whirlwind of activity is starting to cool down now, and with no new releases on the horizon, it looks like EXID are going to take a well-deserved break for a while. They probably won’t be away for that long, though—a lengthy hiatus increases a K-pop artist’s chances of falling off the radar, after all. But I don’t think EXID have to worry too much about that, given that “Up & Down” has established them as major players in the K-pop world. In the meantime, you can check out their other music (along with dance practices and interviews, if you know Korean) on YouTube.

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LeAnn Nguyen

New artist sparks my heart: JUNGLE FIRES

In this dreary period of somber winter nights, I’ve felt a little melancholy. I’m pining for sunshine, for sweet summertime nights, for nights around the campfire drinking some lemonade. I’m pining for the days of cool relaxation and no stress. Mostly, I’m pining for cool, fresh new music, and I think I found it.

So… we should meet JUNGLE FIRES.

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A New York based duo composed of artists Menashé David Israel & Kéren Or-Tayar, JUNGLE FIRES is a brand new artist that puts indie pop and indie soul on the map. With beautiful piano harmonies,some chill electric guitar, and soulful vocals, their debut album Bliss Point is sure to take center
stage.

It’s a six-track album with its number one track creating
the perfect interest into their record. Brilliant song, “Nothing Can Be
Changed,” JUNGLE FIRES builds this track up softly, quietly, but very, very
clean. Kéren, one of the artists in the duo, dominates in terms of vocals with Menashé
backseating it. However, the two harmonize well, and Kéren’s voice is beautiful
as she rolls on with excellent control. This track is full of acoustic
harmonies and some nice piano melodies that hints to me of some jazz
influences. This song sounds cool and all, right? Yet, I think what makes it
excellent is its free-flowing rhythm and very distinct lack of catchy “boppiness.”
This is no Alex & Sierra piano pop duo in which you take hold of the
predictable chorus and happily sing along. The melody in this track takes turns
you wouldn’t expect, but the artists do it very masterfully with soft vocals
and strong instrumentals reminiscent of instrumentalist artist Explosions in the Sky. Ending the first
track with some echoing whistles, I got the campfire, classy soul vibe and I
felt tranquil.

I’m not going to spoil the entire album for you, as you should
take a listen for it yourself. But, we definitely need to talk about my favorite
track off this new record, “It’s Okay.” There are so many reasons I love this
track. It’s a little more fast-paced, and we hear more of Menashé’s vocals and
it’s great. But more than that, the two did something awesome, and added horns into
this track. The trumpet that’s going on gives this Middle Eastern/Spanish vibe,
and it creates this song as jazz, soul, and pop all in one. I think what I love
most of about this track is its ethnic reminiscence and its musical diversity.
They have soft vocals, and they have good vocals, but I could definitely see the two going off in this direction that is
very acoustic guitar pop, very cookie cutter radio style. And the fact they are
doing their completely own sound makes me very happy.

The rest of the album is pretty fantastic for a debut. Their
October 2014 single, “Hold,” is a track that is a bit more folk based, but has a bit
more traditional harmony with Kéren leading the vocals. I like it though, and I’m
glad they put in the record. “Open Eyes” is beautiful as Menashé softly almost
whispers “Shouting as loud as a siren of war/ Just to desperately reach to your
world” over the hints of tambourine, violin, and guitar. “Best of Me” ends the record
on a fantastically high note, with a much more pop vibe, and I’m not complaining.
These guys know what they’re doing.

Agh, have I converted you yet? Hopefully, enough for you to
listen to their album here:

http://junglefires.com/releases

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Get it now while it’s hot.

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Ariana Rivera

Album Review: Gem Jones – Admiral Frenchkiss

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Lo-fi pop doesn’t tend to be too rhythmic. The bedroom musicians who produce it tend to focus more on things like melody or atmosphere, since rhythm is probably harder to create with the limited production capabilities of a bedroom or whatever. If there’s anyone out there who’s starved for rhythm (also known as “groove” or “funk”) in the lo-fi world, don’t despair—Gem Jones can fulfill your need. The Iowa City producer’s latest release, Admiral Frenchkiss, grooves hard while still retaining a ragtag lo-fi charm.

Admiral Frenchkiss opens with “Black Lantern,” which combines jazzy brass with off-kilter synth effects. The combination sounds a little strange at first, but the track is nonetheless infectious with its energy. The same can be said for “Rock N Roll Dementia” and its soulful melodies. In both songs, the real star is the rhythm section: the drums and bass keep the melodies grooving along steadily. Things slow down a bit for the keyboard-driven “Shallow Rivers” (which, strangely enough, reminds me a bit of the “Waves” record from Nintendogs) and the laid-back “God in U.” Weirdness still creeps into these tracks, though—the meandering electronic sounds at the end of “God in U,” for example, elevates it from a straight reggae tribute to something more interesting. “Grimeshock” kicks things back into high gear with drums, bass, and synths once again powering away with a fierce rhythm. And finally, there’s “Ectomorphic Love,” a spacey ballad that sounds kind of like a love song from an alien. In fact, the whole album kind of sounds like it could’ve come from an alien, since I have no idea what Jones is singing the entire time. His voice ranges from falsettos recalling the days of classic soul to manic shouts reminiscent of Damo Suzuki. Rather than detracting from it, these vocals help to increase the weird appeal of the music.

With all the wild sounds present on Admiral Frenchkiss, it can be surprising to learn that Jones played all the instruments himself. It’s impressive that he managed to coordinate such controlled musical chaos on his own, and it’s an achievement worthy of commendation. So, you can reward Jones’ effort by buying Admiral Frenchkiss at his Bandcamp or getting it on cassette from Goaty Tapes. This is the kind of music that sounds good even when blasted out of a cheap old cassette deck—it might even sound better that way, actually.

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LeAnn Nguyen