Album Review: Priests- Nothing Feels Natural

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Priests have been around for a few years now, but Nothing Feels Natural marks their first full-length album release. Originating from DC, they continue in the legacy of a long line of DC-based punk bands. This history is reflected in the band’s music, which evokes the sound of older punk and post-punk bands from the past. This connection does not mean their music sounds outdated however; on the contrary, this album feels fresh as ever. 

The album kicks off with the lines “You want some new brutalism?/You want something you can write home about,”  a powerful opening phrase that sets the tone for the remainder of the album. Opening track “Appropriate” starts off as a solid opener before dropping off in momentum towards the end of the song, however things pick back up again after this song. “Pink White House” feels highly relevant in current times with it’s take down of American culture and the electoral system. ­­

Other highlights from the album include catchy “Jj,” a biting dismissal in song form, and “No Big Bang,” a personal favorite of mine, with (mostly) spoken word vocals, and a repeating guitar riff carrying the song through. Title track “Nothing Feels Natural” didn’t make much of an impression on me at first listen, but quickly grew to be a standout song on repeat plays. The one gripe I have with the album would be the track “Puff,” which just comes across as slightly grating and irritating. 

The band’s musical talents are clear on this album, with skillful guitar work and powerful drumming. Frontwoman Katie Greer’s vocals, somewhat reminiscent of Kathleen Hanna, are definitely one of the biggest assets of the band. 

Priests show a great deal of promise on what is only their first album. Already they show an ability to experiment and expand within the traditional confines of their genre. Hopefully any future output from them will continue this level of quality work.

Bandcamp / Website / Tumblr

-Noah Prince

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Live Review: Loud Rock Reigns at Showbox SoDo

On Thursday night I had the opportunity to see a show at the Showbox SoDo featuring indie rock titans Black Rebel Motorcycle Club and Death From Above 1979.  The spacious converted warehouse provided a nice backdrop to one of the loudest concert experiences I’ve ever had.  Seriously, if you’re seeing a show here any time soon, bite the bullet and spring for some earplugs.  You’ll regret it if you don’t.  I tend to prefer more intimate concert experiences; smaller, sweatier venues are really more my style.  The SoDo isn’t that at all, with its high ceilings and air-conditioned floor.  Still, the show was a good one.

The openers for the two main acts were L.A. punk duo Deap Vally, who brought a lot of energy into a raucous, noisy set.  Featuring Karen O-like wails from lead singer Lindsey Troy, the band crashed through a tight set, capped with standout closer “Royal Jelly”.  Deap Vally is touring behind their sophomore LP, Femejism, and they injected a lot of life into the smaller crowd, as people clearly there for one headliner or another started to trickle onto the main floor.  There were plenty of reminders that they were an opener; they played in front of a looming DFA1979 graphic, and mentioned their opener status multiple times.  However, they did a great job in that role.

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The second act of the night was Death From Above 1979, another duo, but this time one from Toronto.  These two have been revered in the indie scene since the release of their debut LP, 2004’s You’re a Woman, I’m a Machine (which I would absolutely recommend giving a listen), and even though they’re both well into their thirties, they brought an incredible energy to the set.  Drummer and vocalist Sebastien Grainger screamed his heart out and thrashed his kit, and bassist Jesse Keeler kept an unreal air of cool as he tore through some very technical and challenging riffs on his heavily distorted and booming bass.  Though it was during these guys’ set that I started to notice exactly how loud it was in the venue, I didn’t really care: they absolutely killed it.  They put an extended middle section into You’re a Woman… single “Romantic Rights”, which turned out to be probably the highlight of the night, as they built the anticipation up for almost two minutes before laying into another incredible minute of the track.  As they left to an impressive light display, it was clear that the bar for the next band was set very high.

Finally, out stepped the true veterans of the night.  Around since their formation in 1998, Black Rebel Motorcycle Club were the elder statesmen of the evening, and their set started to show signs of fatigue.  The band hasn’t released a new album since 2013’s The Spectre at the Feast, and although that record is a decent one, it has started to become apparent that they need some new material.  Though they did well at the start (with the highlight track from Spectre, “Let the Day Begin”, breathing some life into the set), the rest of the set was less than inspiring.  Noise fatigue had started to settle in for me, and going from the incredible energy of DFA1979 to the more subdued, bluesy BRMC set was not a great transition for the latter band.  They put on a brave face, but their set, and likely their audience as well, are starting to get tired.

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The show was punctuated with some great lighting as well, setting an ominous tone for BRMC’s set that works well for their style.  It was a good show in a big venue, and even though I felt the SoDo’s size for every second of every set, I had a blast.

A good show for listeners of: The Black Keys, The Dead Weather, Japandroids, Yeah Yeah Yeahs.

Sample Tracks:

Deap Vally: “Royal Jelly”

Death From Above 1979: “Right On, Frankenstein!”  “Romantic Rights”

Black Rebel Motorcycle Club: “Let the Day Begin”  “Beat the Devil’s Tattoo”

John Morse

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Basement – Album Preview

England’s Basement
are releasing their first new album in four years and the alternative rock
scene is buzzing with excitement. The band went on hiatus in 2012 after the release
and supporting tour of their last full-length, Colourmeinkindness. Since then, they’ve released just one EP, 2014’s
Further Sky.

The five-piece from Ipswich,
England blends pop-punk, emo, grunge, and hardcore. Their sound can switch from
angry and head-pounding to ambient and wistful at the snap of a finger. My
personal favorite song of theirs encapsulates this perfectly. The tune starts
out with vocalist Andrew Fisher
crooning about someone who is regrettably no longer in his life before quickly
turning into a hardcore jam.

Three singles have been released in
anticipation of the new album, Promise
Everything
. The first single and title track of the album picks up nicely right
where Colourmeinkindess left off. The
bass break halfway though the song just slays. 

The next single, “Oversized”, is
a slightly slower, softer, and more melancholy tune. It doesn’t jump out at me
like some other songs in their discography, but it’s solid.

The third and final single, “Aquasun”,
is easily my favorite of the bunch. The chorus is a little more poppy than
anything they’ve done in the past, but at the same time it just feels like a
classic Basement song. The bridge and outro are so chill. I love it. “Aquasun” also features the band’s first music video, directed by their very own guitarist, Alex Henery.

Promise
Everything
will be released January 29th, and it will absolutely
be worth a listen if you prefer your emo with some bite to it.

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RJ Morgan



Check out more music and news from Rainy Dawg Radio @ RainyDawg.org!

Album Review: Seaway – Colour Blind

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If a new American Pie
movie were to be made today, Canada’s up-and-coming Seaway would write the soundtrack. Colour Blind is the band’s sophomore album and their first full-length
release for Pure Noise Records, and
it’s definitely one of the year’s best pop-punk releases.

Pop-punk exploded in the mid-to-late 2000’s and, like most
of us, you probably got sick of it. But in the past few years the genre has
seen what could almost be called a re-birth. You’ve got everything from bands
like The Story So Far and Knuckle Puck combining the grit of hardcore
with pop-punk to groups like The Front
Bottoms
who put a folk-esque twist on the genre. While the music’s great,
it seems like so much of it lacks the fun
that used to be such a staple of the genre.

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That’s where Seaway’s got you covered.

What makes Seaway unique is that they harken back to the pop-punk of the early
2000’s. Remember the days when you’d hear blink-182
and Sum 41 at the mall? From the
start of Colour Blind you’ll
instantly feel like you’re back in that mall jamming to “Fat Lip” over the PA. These
songs aren’t out to make you sad. They’re for blasting on your way to a party
where you hope you don’t hurt yourself doing a keg stand. A few of the standout
tracks are “Best Mistake”, “Still Weird”, and “Turn Me Away”.

The lead single for the album, “Freak”, is the best of the bunch. It kicks off with a beautiful guitar riff and leads into an intro that will make you want to
stop whatever you’re doing and find the nearest available mosh pit.

For some, the nostalgia-factor may come across a little shtick-y,
but I enjoy it. The video for “Best Mistake” bombards you with everything it meant to be
a Canadian kid growing up in the late 90’s. Some of the video’s references
might be lost on Americans, but those of us south of the border will still eat
up the Drake/Degrassi cameo and the old videogame references.

The lyrics, while undoubtedly catchy, aren’t exactly
groundbreaking. The subject matter for most of the songs is your standard
pop-punk fare (girls, not fitting into the crowd, etc.). Sometimes a strong vocal delivery
can make up for less-than-innovative lyrics though, and I think this is where Seaway
really shines on this record. When Ryan Locke, the vocalist with the deeper register,
belts out the chorus to “Airhead” or the outro of “Stubborn Love”, you can
really feel the raw emotion behind the words. 

In a style similar to Taking Back Sunday or Four Year Strong (Alan Day of Four Year
Strong was actually one of the producers of the album), the band features two
vocalists who often trade lines back and forth throughout the songs. “Turn Me
Away” is the best example of what can happen when the dual vocals are used
right, and when it works it sounds great.

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While this record doesn’t exactly push any boundaries musically or lyrically, it’s just so damn fun. Look for Seaway to make a big splash in the pop-punk scene with this solid release.

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RJ Morgan



Check out more music and news from Rainy Dawg Radio @ RainyDawg.org!

An Ode to Twin Peaks

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When you first hear the words Twin Peaks,” David Lynch’s 90s TV series investigating the murder of Laura Palmer might come to mind. Or maybe you think of the landmark identical hills in San Francisco.

Up until recently, whenever anyone said “Twin Peaks,” those were the two things that came to my mind. Then a couple months ago, my friend told me to check out an up-and-coming garage rock band that he claimed were “underrated.”

So I did. And ever since, whenever I hear “Twin Peaks,” I think of the dreamy four piece that stole my heart in mid- February.

Twin Peaks was formed in 2009 while the boys (vocalist/guitarist Cadien Lake James, vocalist/guitarist Clay Frankel, bassist Jack Dolan, and drummer Connor Brodner) were still in high school in Chicago. After graduating, most of them made their way to the West Coast where they studied at Evergreen in Olympia, probably chasing the remnants of the Seattle area garage/punk rock scene. Shortly after, all of them ended up dropping out to focus on pursuing music. And so it all began.

For ME, it all began when I watched the music video for “Making Breakfast”:

Okay, admittedly I was a bit distracted by the overwhelming cuteness of one of the lead singers, Clay (he’s just real cute). On a more serious note, this band is very awesome. Making Breakfast is my favorite song on their newest album Wild Onion, and it’s so great because it has a wonderful goofy, cheesy charm. 

They take their music seriously, but don’t take themselves too seriously. That, to me, is a perfect balance. And this attitude rubs off on listeners. You can’t take anything too seriously when listening to Making Breakfast: 

Nothing is forever, that’s right but don’t let it get you down

Thanks Twin Peaks! I won’t let it get me down! I can’t count the times I’ve been walking through campus on a gloomy day and I got an instant high from blasting that song in my headphones. It takes a huge effort to stop myself from dancing in the midst of hundreds of strangers.

Listen to it! You can’t help but start dancing. And then right in the middle of the album they just threw in a crazy sax solo! A garage rock band did that! What an interlude. It’s insane because it’s so random, and when I first heard it I thought I was imagining things but I promise it’s really there.

Get ready to hear a lot more of Twin Peaks. Lined up to play at giant music festivals like Sasquatch, Lollapalooza, and Outside Lands, Twin Peaks really has the potential to bring back the sound of danceable garage rock. They are relatable, hilarious, and their perfect mix of laid-back vibes and high energy could make them turn into icons for the slacker generation.

I love them. I love everything about them. (And I especially love Clay). You should love them too. Do something good for yourself. Download Wild Onion and listen to it on repeat for three months, because thats what I’ve been doing and it’s been going pretty damn well.

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izzy

Sleater-Kinney is back!

I was born in the 90s, but, more importantly, so was Sleater-Kinney.

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Just over 20 years ago Corin Tucker, Carrie Brownstein and Janet Weiss got together in Olympia, Washington and joined their musical forces and created the punk rock genius that is Sleater-Kinney. By converting their riot grrrl movement experience into music, this Pacific Northwest-based girl group was known for proudly vocalizing their feminist and liberal perspectives. The band released seven studio albums before (unfortunately) announcing their indefinite hiatus in 2006.

Luckily, though, they’re back! After nearly a decade of silence, Sleater-Kinney came back to life on Tuesday, January 20 and released their eighth studio album, No Cities to Love. Listen to it here.

Sleater-Kinney’s lengthy hiatus made room for some fresh collaboration and resulted in an empowering, catchy-as-hell album. I love this album because it combines Brownstein’s outrageous guitar skills with Tucker’s intense vocals in a way that will make you want to dance around and dismantle the patriarchy at the same time. The distinctive sound of No Cities to Love will allow long-time fans to reminisce on the good old days and give new listeners the opportunity to step outside of their contemporary comfort zones.

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“The core of this record is our relationship to each other, to the music, and how all of us still felt strongly enough to about those to sweat it out in the basement and to try and reinvent our band,” said lead vocalist Corin Tucker.

The band is currently on a world tour, too. If you like what you hear and you want to see Sleater-Kinney live and in the flesh check out their website for tour dates here.

Thanks, Sleater-Kinney, for reigniting the fiery grrrl power in all of us.

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nilorap

Rad Report: A mind-blowing evening with Laura Jane Grace

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“The best place to start would be at the beginning,” said Laura Jane Grace of Against Me! as she walked out on stage right here at The University of Washington this past Saturday night (the 22nd).

Where and when is the beginning of any of our personal journeys? Is it when we start understanding our own identities? Is it the moment that we first realize we are doing what we love? For Laura Jane Grace, the beginning was when she dropped out of high school and began writing songs. Sure, she may have been writing since she was a lot younger; but at age eighteen, Against Me! was started by Grace. Stemming off of many long years full of anger and angst, her music was based on DIY, anarcho-punk, and protest music movements.

I may not be a long time fan of her music, but listening to Laura play guitar and sing her moving lyrics on Saturday has turned me into a fan of hers for eternity. Starting out the show with one of the first songs she ever wrote, “Walking Is Still Honest,” I got a really deep sense of the type of music that Grace writes.

This song has beautiful lyrics, and lets listeners in on how it feels to realize truths in this world. At this point in her life, Laura was experiencing an extreme sense of gender dyspohoria—which motivated her to continue writing songs that were tremendously telling of her emotions, which would later inspire others who felt the same as her.

One of these songs, with completely awesome lyrics, is “Tonight We’re Gonna Give it 35%.” She even paused in the middle of this song to fill the audience in, saying “and this is the dysphoria part.” Along with getting laughs from the audience with her naturally hilarious demeanor, she seemed instantly relatable.

Another song she sang for us, “Pretty Girls,” really allowed listeners to develop insight into Laura’s thoughts and feelings at the time she wrote this. One line stands out, “Sometimes at night, I pray to wake a different person in a different place.” Whether or not we’ve experienced gender dysphoria, we’ve all experienced feeling uncomfortable in our skin—again making Laura a relatable role model to all of us.

As the night continued, I felt myself become absorbed in each song and story that Laura shared. The next songs on her set list were “Dead Friend,” written for Laura’s heartbreak over a friend passing away; “Two Coffins,” originally written for her daughter; “FuckMyLife666,” which is about coming out publicly in Rolling Stone and dealing with a breakup with her second wife; “Paralytic States,” where she shares that at this point in her life she was “never quite the woman that she wanted to be;” and then lastly she sang a cover of a song that she felt very connected to, “Androgynous,” originally by Paul Westerberg.

The latest songs that she’s written deal with the frustration of feeling pressure to change oneself to fit the mold of what society wants—whether that be a gender role or a major record label’s idea of what’s perfect to them. But the greatest part about this fantastic evening with Laura Jane Grace is that she made it clear that there isn’t simply one mold to fit into.

She left the audience with words of wisdom: she says with a laugh that she’s “a high school dropout, transgender, ex junky with a felony record” in the most reassuring way possible. I say “reassuring” because after years of battling all the challenges she’s had to, she’s coming into herself and on top of this, is inspiring and giving hope to people all around the world dealing with similar struggles to the one’s she’s endured.

At the end of the show, there was a question and answer session where fans were able to ask her just about anything. I decided to take the backseat and listen to insight she had to share. She had so many beautiful answers to these questions, but one really stuck out to me. When asked about Laura’s daughter’s knowledge of her being transgender, she said that her daughter is pretty good about understanding; however, what I loved about this was that Laura said she’s been trying to teach her daughter to “be true to yourself and to [not be] ashamed” of who you are. I just loved this—because what’s a better way to teach something than to practice what you preach?

That is exactly what Laura Jane Grace is doing with her life—as a parent, as a musician, as a transgender woman, and as an inspiration and a muse to all of us.

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Rad Rebs

Rad Report: Experimental Label–Danger Collective Records–Expands to Seattle

There are very few times that a dream is captured and transformed into reality. So often we realize that we’ve aspired our whole lives toward one goal and never fully achieved it. This is clearly not the circumstance in the case of Danger Collective Records—an experimental record label started and based in Los Angeles—which was created on a brilliant principle of “by artists for artists” in January of 2014. A few old friends of mine from high school created this label—Reed Kanter is the original founder with help from Michael Lewis, Jackson Katz, Patrick Jewett, and Nolan Pearson. “When [Reed] started the label [he] was trying to put this idea of…‘talent without fans’…into motion” 

(Reed Kanter), and the dream seems to have come true. After growing up in a somewhat isolated area in the mountains surrounding the LA area where there wasn’t a strong market for small shows and live music, Reed gathered a group of his friends and changed that with a goal in mind “to bring people together over music and make a difference for bands” (Reed Kanter). He created a record label, which is now expanding across the country. I’ve been lucky enough to stay in touch with Reed—who is currently living in New York, and I’ve also stayed close with Michael as we both made the move from LA to Seattle this past fall.

I, myself, have enjoyed jamming to the indie rock/garage punk music that I’ve experienced at the Danger Collective shows down in LA; but what really caught my attention was when I heard from Michael that Danger Collective is no longer solely concentrated in LA—and is actually expanding to both New York (courtesy of Reed) and Seattle (courtesy of Michael)! The moment I heard this, my excitement grew—just knowing that I might soon have the opportunity to jam out to the awesome tunes being produced by this innovative label whether I’m in LA, my home town; Seattle, my true love and current home; or New York, just visiting.

When I heard about the expansion, I naturally had tons of questions for Michael and Reed about this big move up north and back east. So I set up a time to meet with Michael in hopes that he could give me some inside information on the extension of the label in our very own backyard; I later was able to contact Reed as well to hear about how the expansion is progressing in New York.

Michael is now the CFO, and is mainly in control of the money and distribution in the newly forming Seattle branch. I asked him what inspired him to expand the label further north and he explained that it was mostly a mix of the convenience of being able to go to an awesome school like UW and being able to further develop the label in a remarkable city such as Seattle with such an established music scene.


The Collective’s punk bands duel it out at INSIDELANDS 2014

Danger Collective generally signs bands with a very ‘Los Angeles-esque’ sound, but the label has been really good about not boxing itself into any group of specific genres or subgenres. Danger Collective actually signs bands on an extremely wide spectrum of categories—examples of these varieties include “garage rock/post punk (Slow Hollows and Bobby T and The Slackers), Punk (Cool Runnings and P.H.F of New Zealand) psychedelic rock (Casinos and Te Amo), ambient trap (Polo Club and Best Friend, experimental (Nirvanus), singer song writer (Salmon), pop punk (Rexx), and more,” according to Reed Kanter.

However, when I had the opportunity to sit down and chat with Michael, he noted that “eventually the Seattle sound, the really weird, like…electronic-y thing will…seep” into the label’s unique mix of music that they represent, which I’m really looking forward to. Despite being open-minded to the idea of letting in new genres and moods of music, Michael admitted to me that “LA had a really big influence on [the label] because that’s what [the creators of the label] were used to [listening to their whole] lives.” It seems that these LA vibes are making their way up to Seattle as Michael has gotten Danger Collective’s “releases into several record stores” in the Seattle area (according to Reed Kanter).

Reed currently does a lot for the label in addition to being the original founder; despite his role in “[managing] artists, [booking] shows, [promoting] bands, [contacting] pressing factories for vinyl, [pressing] cassette tapes, [reviewing] submitted demos, …[managing] the social media, and [taking a role in] anything else that needs to be done,” he humbly told me that he “can’t take all the credit” for the label’s success, and he is very grateful for his friends’ help and support.

He is currently busy in New York getting shows together and spreading word of Danger Collective to the east coast. There’s actually already been a New York show presented by Danger Collective in which Reed took a different approach than the label usually does as he “went for a more electronic genre. Nirvanus opened and he was followed by Best Friend, Eaves, Tele/Visions, then Young Ejecta who headlined.” It sounds like it was a fucking rad show, and I seriously recommend checking out all of these artists. It made me wish I could’ve been in New York for it, but got me extremely enthusiastic about the future potential Danger Collective has right here in the amazing city we live in.

Michael let me know that once a couple more Danger Collective representatives make their way up to Washington, he hopes to have the resources to begin signing local Seattle artists and putting together shows—so keep your eyes and ears peeled for more information on that! In the meantime, get a taste of Danger Collective’s artists in a video playlist from the New Radio presentation, Battle Show IV:

Currently involved in the label are Reed Kanter, Michael Lewis, Jackson Katz, Nolan Pearson, Patrick Jewett, Dylan Thinnes, Franklin Newby, and Nick Fenjves. The label has come a long way in just a year, with their expansion spanning across the country. According to Reed, “Danger Collective Records now has music in stores across the country and [the label has their] artists featured on iTunes and Spotify.” I’m obviously thrilled about what’s to come for the Seattle branch of Danger Collective Records, and can’t wait to see where all divisions of the label go in the future. Be sure to follow Danger Collective Records at dangercollectiverecords.com and on Facebook, and keep an eye out for upcoming shows presented by Danger Collective Records in the Seattle area (or in LA/New York if you’re ever stopping by)!

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Rad Rebs

Artist Profile: Naomi Punk

Naomi Punk is a post-punk band from Olympia, WA. But to classify them as such does not do their music justice, as it doesn’t seem to fit into any particular mold. It has to be listened to be understood, and even then I sometimes notice myself discovering new layers to their sound with each time I play one of their records.

It may be cliché to say that an artist’s music grows on you, but in the case of Naomi Punk it’s just true. When I first listened to their debut The Feeling on a recommendation from a friend, I was unconvinced. The album sounded thrown together, its melodies buried under distortion and its lyrics indiscernible. But as I listened to it again I began to notice myself humming along and my foot tapping more and more enthusiastically.

Once I grew familiar with the sound of the album it became contagious. Naomi Punk had already been playing together and touring for a couple years before The Feeling was recorded, and the live energy of the band can be felt throughout the album. The songs all have a unique character to them, and yet on the whole the album feels very solidly like a singular conception. Apart from two tracks based around a synthesizer, the songs are driven only by two guitars and a set of drums, and sound like they could have all been recorded in the same take. This gives The Feeling a familiar and cohesive sound that you learn to appreciate more with each listen.

The band’s follow up, Television Man, was released in August of this year and has a very similar quality to The Feeling. While not as immediately rewarding as their debut, Television Man has many layers of its own and is at times equally engaging. After two solid releases, Naomi Punk feels like a band with a ton of potential and one that would be an incredible live experience. After all, the band has its roots on stage, not in the studio.

Picking out a standout track is difficult because my favorite from them changes practically every time I hear one of their albums, but a good place to start would be “The Spell” off The Feeling:

Editor’s Note: Naomi Punk’s website can be found here: http://naomipunkmusicgroup.com/
They don’t have any music there, however, so you’re best off just heading to their record label’s page, Captured Tracks, or their Facebook

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Jamie Coughlin

Outlander in the Emerald City: Lync – These Are Not Fall Colors (Flashback Album Review)

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Formed in 1992, Lync was one of the pioneers of the indie rock scene that grew out of Olympia and Seattle in the early- to mid-1990s.  Comprised of vocalist/guitarist Sam Jayne, bassist/vocalist James Bertram, and drummer Dave Schneider, Lync’s strengths encompass discordant riffs, intertwining guitar and bass melodies and a heavy, driving beat to keep the ground solid underneath.  Jayne’s vocals are beautifully indistinct while maintaining a screechiness that is bound to make your head ache delightfully.  With only one full album under their belt, These Are Not Fall Colors showcases the band in a head-bang worthy package, drawing comparisons to hardcore favorites such as Fugazi and Unwound.

Where to listen: The full album can be found on YouTube (streaming after the jump)

Where to buy: Check out Lync’s bandcamp (http://lync1994.bandcamp.com/album/these-are-not-fall-colors) if you like what you hear!

The album opens with “B”, beginning with a bombardment of feedback extending into a melodically brooding riff and rolling drumbeat, wasting no time in showcasing Lync’s talents in the post-hardcore vein.  The song takes off into a soaring barrage of distortion and chunky rhythms, with Jayne double-tracking his screaming vocals over the chorus.  Although the lyrics maintain an ambiguous quality throughout the song (and most of the album for that matter), a few profound lines shine through, including the repeated “You only need your own air to breathe.”  Lync’s influences can be easily traced back to classics like Pixies and Sonic Youth with their use of the (now almost-clichéd) alt-rock loud/soft dynamic; however, they implement it differently, often giving breathing room in the chorus while still never losing intensity in the verses.  “Silverspoon Glasses” is no exception to this rule, featuring swelling walls of distortion that collapse into haunting yet beautiful melodies.  The album continues with the supremely catchy “Cue Cards”, featuring the classic off-kilter arpeggio and rolling drumbeat combination, with a bass-line to guide the major melodies, a trick peers Modest Mouse picked up (and perfected) in their first few records.  The last track, “Uberrima Fides,” allows the album to close out with a bang, climaxing to a kick-ass buildup before the reverb-drenched outro jam (which takes its guitar effects from space-rock gods Caustic Resin and Built to Spill).  The feedback at the end of the track allows the album to fade out as it began, ready to be replayed and re-appreciated by its fans.  Although twenty years have passed since its release, These Are Not Fall Colors remains a highly influential record in the indie rock scene that has grown to such great heights in our alt-loving society of today

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Katie Hanford